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Faculty Listings

Faculty
Fred Bahnson

Fred Bahnson

Director of the Food, Faith and
Religious Leadership Initiative

bahnsoff@wfu.edu

Education:
BA, Montana State University
MTS, Duke Divinity School

Fred Bahnson directs the Food, Faith, & Religious Leadership Initiative. He is the author of Soil and Sacrament: A Spiritual Memoir of Food and Faith (Simon & Schuster) and co-author of Making Peace With the Land: God’s Call to Reconcile With Creation (InterVarsity). His narrative journalism and essays have appeared widely including Oxford American, Image, Orion, The Sun, Christian Century, and the anthologies Best American Spiritual Writing (Houghton Mifflin), Wendell Berry and Religion (University Press of Kentucky), and State of the World 2011—Innovations that Nourish the Planet (Norton). His writing has received a number of grants and awards, including a William Raney scholarship in nonfiction at Bread Loaf Writers Conference, an Award of Excellence from the Associated Church Press, a Kellogg Food & Community fellowship at the Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy, and a North Carolina Artist fellowship in creative nonfiction from the NC Arts Council. In addition to his writing, Bahnson is an experienced permaculture gardener. The co-founder of Anathoth Community Garden in Cedar Grove, NC, he has practiced and taught regenerative agriculture for the past ten years.

Jill Y. Crainshaw

Jill Y. Crainshaw

Blackburn Professor of Worship and
Liturgical Theology

crainsjy@wfu.edu

Education:
BA, Wake Forest; MDiv, Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary; PhD, Union Theological Seminary/ Presbyterian School of Christian Education

Crainshaw’s research interests include liturgical theology, vocational formation for ministry, and feminist perspectives on church leadership. She is the author of a number of books and articles, including Wise and Discerning Hearts: An Introduction to a Wisdom Liturgical Theology (Liturgical Press, 2000), Keep the Call: Leading the Congregation without Losing Your Soul (Abingdon, 2007), and Wisdom’s Dwelling Place: Exploring a Wisdom Liturgical Spirituality(Order of St. Luke Press, 2010). Crainshaw is co-editor of the two-volume Encyclopedia of Religious Controversies in the Unites States (ABC-Clio, 2012). She is a Teaching Elder in the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.).

James M. Dunn

James M. Dunn

Resident Professor of Christianity and
Public Policy

dunnj@wfu.edu

Education:
BA, Texas Wesleyan College; 
MDiv, PhD, Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary; LLD, Alderson Broaddus College, William Jewell College; DD, Central Baptist Theological Seminary, Furman; Franklin College; DHumL, Linfield College; post-doctoral work, London School of Economics and Political Science

Dunn's scholarly research and activism have been in the fields of church-state relations, religious liberty, and public policy. He was Director of the Christian Life Commission for Texas Baptists in the 1960s and 1970s, and then served for 20 years as Executive Director of the Baptist Joint Committee on Religious Liberty. He has served as President of Bread for the World and Chair of the Ethics Commission of the Baptist World Alliance. His writing includes testimonies before both Houses of the United States Congress, hundreds of articles, reviews, and essays in scholarly journals, and 40 years of writing for Report from the Capital, a publication of the Baptist Joint Committee. He has also co-authored numerous books including a 2011 festschrift in honor of Edwin Scott Gaustad. In January 2012 the School of Divinity announced its first endowed faculty chair, the James and Marilyn Dunn Chair of Baptist Studies, presently held by Bill J. Leonard. Dunn is an ordained minister in the American Baptist Churches USA.

Thomas E. Frank

Thomas E. Frank

University Professor

frankte@wfu.edu

Education:
BA, Harvard; MDiv, Candler School of Theology, Emory; PhD, Emory; Master of Heritage Preservation, Georgia State

Thomas E. Frank teaches courses in leadership and administration, and spirituality and the arts. His scholarship focuses on the history and culture of American mainstream Protestantism. Frank has written several books including, The Soul of the Congregation: An Invitation to Congregational Reflection (Abingdon Press 2000), which explores the culture and imagination of local church congregations. He offers a course on the relationship between Protestant Christianity and the liberal arts and is the author of Theology, Ethics, and the Nineteenth Century American College Ideal: Conserving a Rational World (Mellen, 1993). He has authored two books on United Methodism, most recently with Russell E. Richey, Episcopacy in the Methodist Tradition: Perspectives and Proposals (Abingdon Press 2004), and his Polity, Practice, and the Mission of The United Methodist Church is the standard text on polity (Abingdon Press 2006 Edition). His research on the place of congregations and religious institutions in the settlement and built landscape of America led him to pursue a master of heritage preservation degree at Georgia State, which he completed in 2006. Frank is an ordained elder in the United Methodist Church.

Gary Gunderson

Gary Gunderson

Professor of Faith and Health
of the Public

ggunders@wakehealth.edu

Education:
BA, Wake Forest University; MDiv, Candler School of Theology, Emory; DMin, Interdenominational Theological Center

Gary Gunderson is the Vice President for Faith and Health of Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center where he focuses on how faith is an asset for healthcare and the health of the community. His teaching focus will be on applied research in the medical center and community contexts. Gunderson is internationally recognized for his fundamental creative conceptual work in the field and the large scale networks of congregations with proven impact on health outcomes in Memphis, TN, where he remains a scholar in the Center of Excellence in Faith and Health. Gunderson serves on advisory panels for the World Council of Churches and a network of global faith-based hospitals and retains a faculty role with the University of Cape Town. His research interests include conceptual work on the leading causes of life and religious health assets. His most recent book, co-written with James Cochrane of South Africa, is Religion and the Health of the Public: Changing the Paradigm (Palgrave-McMcillian). Gunderson is an ordained Baptist minister.

Derek S. Hicks

Derek S. Hicks

Assistant Professor of Religion and Culture

hicksds@wfu.edu

Education:
BA, Grambling State University; MA, Dallas Theological Seminary; PhD, Rice University

Derek Hicks teaches and researches broadly in the areas of African American religion, religion in North America, race, the body, religion and foodways, theory and method in the study of religion, Black and Womanist theologies, and cultural studies. He is the author of the book Reclaiming Spirit in the Black Faith Tradition (Palgrave Macmillan, 2012). In addition, Hicks served as assistant editor of the volume entitled African American Religious Cultures (ABC-CLIO Press). He also contributed chapters for the books Blacks and Whites in Christian America: How Racial Discrimination Shapes Religious Convictions by sociologists Dr. Michael Emerson and Dr. Jason Shelton (New York University Press) and the edited volume The Way of Food: Religion, Food, and Eating in North America (Columbia University Press). In support of his scholarship, Hicks has been awarded fellowships and grants from the Ford Foundation, the Fund for Theological Education, the Louisville Institute, and most recently from the Wabash Center and Henry Luce Foundation.

Mark E. Jensen

Mark E. Jensen

Teaching Professor of Pastoral Care
and Pastoral Theology

jensenme@wfu.edu

Education:
BA, Houston Baptist; MDiv, Southern Baptist Theological Seminary; PhD, Southern Baptist Theological Seminary

Jensen’s PhD work was in Pastoral Care, Psychology of Religion, and Theology and his current research and teaching interests lie at the intersections of faith, health, sustainability, and community. He is a Certified Supervisor with the Association for Clinical Education. Jensen published Shattered Vocations (1990) and has written articles and chapters on narrative, pastoral care, and pastoral supervision. He has worked as a pastoral counselor and hospital chaplain as well as serving in local congregations. Jensen is ordained minister affiliated with the Alliance of Baptists.

Kevin Jung

Kevin Jung

Associate Professor of Christian Ethics

jungk@wfu.edu

Education:
BA, Seoul Theological University; MDiv, Princeton Theological Seminary; STM, Yale Divinity School; PhD, University of Chicago

Kevin Jung works in the field of theological ethics with a particular focus in moral theory. His research interests range from the nature of moral knowledge to human dignity. He is currently working on a book project on neuroscience and theological ethics. Jung was named a Lilly Theological Scholar for 2008-2009 by the Association of Theological Schools (ATS). He has written and contributed to numerous scholarly books and articles including Ethical Theory and Responsibility Ethics (Frankfurt am Main: Peter Lang GmbH, 2011) and Christian Ethics: An Intuitionist Approach (book manuscript). He is also the coeditor of Humanity Before God: Contemporary Faces of Jewish, Christian, and Islamic Ethics (Fortress Press, 2006) and Justice to Mercy: Religion, Law, and Criminal Justice (University of Virginia Press, 2007). He also translated Gene Outka’s Agape: An Ethical Analysis (1999) and John Witte’s From Sacrament to Contract: Marriage and Law in Western Tradition (2006) into Korean, both published by the Christian Literature Society of Korea.

Bill J. Leonard

Bill J. Leonard

James and Marilyn Dunn Professor
of Baptist Studies and
Professor of Church History

leonabj@wfu.edu

Education:
BA, Texas Wesleyan University; 
MDiv, Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary; PhD, Boston University

Leonard's research focuses on Church History with particular attention to American religion, Baptist studies, and Appalachian religion. In addition to a variety of articles in journals and monographs, he is the author or editor of some 22 books including Christianity in Appalachia (1999); Baptist Ways: A History (2003); The Challenge of Being Baptist (2010); and Can I Get a Witness?:Essays, Sermons and Reflections (2013). Leonard is currently involved in research for a book entitled A Sense of the Heart: Christian Religious Experience in the U.S. to be published by Abingdon Press. He is on the editorial board of the Journal of Religion, Disability and Health, and writes a twice-monthly column for the Associated Baptist Press. He is an ordained Baptist minister and a member of First Baptist Church, Highland Avenue (American Baptist Churches, USA).

Veronice Miles

Veronice Miles

Associate Teaching Professor of Preaching
and Religious Education

milesv@wfu.edu

Education:
BA, MEd/EdS, University of Florida; MDiv, Candler School of Theology; PhD, Emory

Miles’ research focuses on hope as a pedagogical construct and embodiment of re-creation in the lives of human persons and communities of faith, transformative practices in preaching and religious education, and womanist epistemology. Her writings include “Living Out-Loud in a World that Demands Silence: Preaching with Adolescents” in Children, Youth and Spirituality in a Troubling World (Chalice, 2008), Pastoral Perspectives on John 11:1-45, Matthew 21:1-11, Matthew 27:11-54 in Feasting on the Word: Preaching the Revised Common Lectionary (Westminster John Knox, 2010), "Defining Moments and Transformative Possibilities" in Ecumenical Trends (January 2011), as well as contributions to The African American Lectionary, Lectionary Homiletic, Teaching Theology and Religion, Homiletic (forthcoming) and The Encyclopedia of Christian Education (forthcoming). She is currently writing a book under the working title Ain’t Gonna Study War No More: Young Black Women and the Audacity to Live with Hope. She is an ordained minister in the Baptist Church.

Clinton J. Moyer

Clinton J. Moyer

Senior Fellow

moyercj@wfu.edu

Education:
BA, University of Washington; MA, PhD, Cornell University





Clinton Moyer approaches the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament with an eye toward its relationship to the larger geographical, historical, and social contexts of the ancient Near Eastern and Mediterranean worlds out of which it arose. His specific interests center on the highly sophisticated literary artistry of the biblical corpus, the formation and development of a distinctive Israelite identity over the course of the biblical period, and biblical prophecy as a cultural and literary phenomenon. Building on his graduate dissertation, “Literary and Linguistic Studies in Sefer Bil‘am (Numbers 22-24)”, Moyer has developed a number of conference papers and articles. He is the recipient of a 2011 Regional Scholar Award from the Society of Biblical Literature for his paper entitled “Who Is the Prophet, and Who the Ass? Role-reversing Interludes and the Unity of the Balaam Narrative (Numbers 22–24)”. He also has published on the close relationship between the biblical book of Esther and the Hellenistic literary sphere. Moyer is heavily invested in the world of online education, and his intensive online summer Hebrew course has met with great success in its employment of a wide range of useful pedagogical tools. In addition, Moyer served as an editorial assistant on Brill's newly published Encyclopedia of Hebrew Language and Linguistics.

Gail R. O’Day

Gail R. O’Day

Dean and Professor of New Testament and
Preaching

odaygr@wfu.edu

Education:
BA, Brown; MTS, Harvard Divinity School; PhD, Emory

O'Day's scholarly research focuses on the Gospel of John, the Bible and preaching, and the history of biblical interpretation. She has written a number of books and articles, including the commentary on the Gospel of John in The New Interpreters Bible (1996) and Preaching the Revised Common Lectionary: A Guide(Abingdon Press, 2007). She is editor or co-editor of several volumes, including the Oxford Access Bible (Revised Edition Oxford University Press 2011), and the Theological Bible Commentary (Westminster John Knox Press, 2009). O'Day was the editor of the Journal of Biblical Literature from 1999-2006 and is currently General Editor of the Society of Biblical Literature book series, Early Christianity and its Literature. She is an ordained minister in the United Church of Christ.

John E. Senior

John E. Senior

Assistant Teaching Professor of Ethics
and Society

seniorje@wfu.edu

Education:
AB, Bowdoin College; MDiv, Harvard Divinity School; PhD., Emory University

John Senior directs the School of Divinity's Art of Ministry program, which includes its field education curriculum. His research focuses on pastoral formation for ministry, field-based learning, and the role of theological education in preparing leaders for a wide variety of institutional settings. Trained in Christian ethics and the sociology of religion, Senior is also interested in political theology and ethics and earth-centered approaches to ministry and the moral life. He is currently completing a manuscript entitled "A Theology of Political Vocation." Senior is an ordained Teaching Elder in the Presbyterian Church (USA).

Katherine A. Shaner

Katherine A. Shaner

Assistant Professor of New Testament

shanerka@wfu.edu

Education:
BA, Luther College; MDiv, Harvard Divinity School; Certificate of Studies, Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago; ThD, Harvard Divinity School

Shaner is currently working on a book entitled, Leading the Master: Ephesos and Enslaved Religious Leadership. Her research draws on archaeological materials from Asia Minor and Greece and focuses particularly on enslaved persons, women, and other marginalized persons within Pauline communities. She teaches introductory New Testament courses and courses on women and slaves in early Christianity, the Corinthian correspondence, and Revelation. Throughout her teaching and scholarship she examines the intersections of race, class, and gender as well as the ethics of contemporary interpretation. She is an ordained pastor in the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (ECLA) and is a regular guest preacher and presider.

E. Frank Tupper

E. Frank Tupper

Professor of Theology

tupperef@wfu.edu

Tupper will be on leave during the 2014-2015 academic year.

Education:
BA, Mississippi College; MDiv, South­western Baptist Theological Seminary; PhD, Southern Baptist Theological Seminary

E. Frank Tupper is one of the founding faculty of the School of Divinity. A native of the Mississippi Delta, Tupper is a well-known lecturer and author. He is noted for his books, The Theology of Wolfhart Pannenberg and A Scandalous Providence: The Jesus Story of the Compassion of God. The latter, published in 1995, reflects more than fifteen years of academic research, theological reflection, and the biographical pondering into a narrative rendering of the providence of God. He is an ordained Baptist minister.

Michelle Voss Roberts

Michelle Voss Roberts

Associate Professor of Theology

robertmv@wfu.edu

Education:
BA, Calvin College; MTS, Candler School of Theology; PhD, Emory

Dr. Voss Roberts teaches in the fields of systematic, comparative, and feminist theologies. She is the author of two books and over a dozen peer-reviewed articles. Her first book, Dualities: A Theology of Difference (Westminster John Knox, 2010), received the award for the Best Book in Hindu-Christian Studies (2008-2011). In her forthcoming book, Tastes of the Divine: Hindu and Christian Theologies of Emotion (Fordham University Press, 2014), she explores the role of the emotions in religious experience through the lens of Indian aesthetic theories. Dr. Voss Roberts currently serves as Secretary for the Society for Hindu-Christian Studies and is past co-chair of the Comparative Theology Group of the American Academy of Religion. She is a lay theologian in the United Methodist Church.

Neal H. Walls

Neal H. Walls

Associate Professor of
Old Testament Interpretation

wallsnh@wfu.edu

Education:
BA, College of William and Mary; MA, University of Virginia; PhD, Johns Hopkins University

A scholar of the Hebrew Bible and related ancient Near Eastern texts, Walls is fascinated by the breadth, depth, and complexity of Old Testament literature. Walls is the author of two books, The Goddess Anat in Ugaritic Myth (1992) and Desire, Discord and Death: Approaches to Ancient Near Eastern Myth (2001). He is the editor of Cult Image and Divine Representation in the Ancient Near East (2005). Walls is currently engaged in research on ancient Near Eastern mythology and a commentary on Genesis 1-11. He also enjoys leading pilgrimages and travel programs throughout Africa and the Middle East.